Railroad Structures
by William Eric McFadden

The depot in Canal Winchester, Ohio

Contents

My sincere thanks go to those numerous individuals who have helped me locate and to identify these stations.


Depots and Stations, by State or Province (return to top)
Quick Jump: Alaska | Indiana | Kentucky | Maryland & DC | Michigan | Missouri | North Carolina
Ohio | Pennsylvania | Tennessee | Virginia | West Virginia | Ontario, Canada | Turkey

Alaska

  • Streetside & trackside views of the Alaska Railroad depot in Denali National Park on April 23, 2005 & May 1, 2005, respectively.
  • Streetside & trackside views of the 1960s-era Alaska Railroad depot in Fairbanks, on April 21, 2005. (And a view of Alaska Railroad GP40-2 #3010 at the point of the Fairbanks-to-Seward passenger train at the station on May 1, 2005.)
  • Streetside & trackside views of the under-construction new Alaska Railroad depot in Fairbanks on May 1, 2005.
  • Streetside & trackside views of the Alaska Railroad depot in Nenana on April 23, 2005.

Indiana

Kentucky

Maryland and the District of Columbia

Michigan

  • The 62-foot baggage building of the Michigan Central/NYC in Bay City, Michigan in August, 1999. This photograph was identified by Gregg Melzer, who added that the station itself has been demolished, but was a huge structure--166' long--and connected to the baggage building via an open connecting passageway.
  • Streetside and trackside views the depot in Grand Blanc, on June 11, 2005. According to Michigan Railroad Photos, Information, & Links this was a Pere Marquette depot.
  • Streetside and trackside views of Smiths Creek depot in Greenfield Village (Dearborn), on June 9, 2005.
  • Walnut Grove Station in Greenfield Village (Dearborn), on June 9, 2005.
  • Streetside & trackside views of the Amtrak station in Dearborn, on June 9, 2005.
  • The former depot in Monroe, on June 18, 2005.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the depot in Omer, on June 11, 2005. According to Michigan Railroad Photos, Information, & Links this was a Detroit & Mackinac depot.
  • The former Duluth, South Shore, & Atlantic (DSS&A) depot in St. Ignace on June 17, 2005. According to Lee Smith, the structure was purchased by Clarence Eby soon after the end or WWII for use as a curio shop. The observation tower was constructed by Eby to serve as an observation tower overlooking the Straits of Mackinaw. The DSS&A traveled from Detroit to Houghton Michigan.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the Michigan Central depot in Standish, Michigan in August, 1999. Lou Van Winkle has photos of this depot's twin in Lawton, Michigan, on his Michigan Passenger Stations web page. According to Lou:
  • In 1865 the Michigan Central bought the Jackson, Lansing and Saginaw Railroad Company which was struggling to complete a line linking the named cities. By 1871, under MC ownership, the road was completed as far as Bay City, and by 1873 extended to Gaylord. In 1881 it was completed to Mackinaw City. This gave the Michigan Central access not only to Lansing, Saginaw, and Bay City, but also to the lumber region of northern Michigan."

  • The Michigan Central depot in Standish as it appeared on June 11, 2005. A sign indicates that a group is raising funds for a restoration.
Missouri

North Carolina

Ohio

  • Two trackside views (1 | 2) and a streetside view of the 1887 former PRR depot in Ada on September 7, 2008.

  • Three views (1 | 2 | 3) of the former T&OC depot in Alexandria on June 11, 2010. On the sign, "Thur" means Thurton, Ohio and "Tol" means Toledo, Ohio.
  • The depot in Ashville, Ohio on October 5, 1997. The town relocated this depot several hundred yards from the trackside and have restored it. Also displayed on-site is an N&W caboose.
  • A second depot in Asheville, Ohio on October 5, 1997. This depot is located very near the grain elevator. Mark J. Camp reports that this was an N&W depot. Update, October 2005: Ed Thomas writes that this was the depot for the former Scioto Valley Traction Railroad and that Ashville was on the Chillicothe Division of this interurban railroad.
  • A street-side view of the former Baltimore & Ohio depot in Athens, Ohio on August 3, 1996.
  • A trackside view of the Athens depot on August 3, 1996. The tracks have been removed, and paving stones now exist in their place at the depot.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former NYC freight house at the Mad River & NKP Museum in Bellevue on September 9, 2007.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former NKP passenger depot at the Mad River & NKP Museum in Bellevue on September 9, 2007.
  • The depot at Brice, Ohio on September 17, 1997. Mark J. Camp reports that this depot was used by the T&OC.
  • Three views (1 | 2 | 3) of the 1892 Toledo & Ohio Central depot in Bucyrus on September 9, 2007. This structure is now a museum of transportation and industry.
  • A depot-like structure and loading-platform on the grounds of the 1892 T&OC depot in Bucyrus

  • The Byesville Scenic Railway depot in Byesville on November 11, 2006.
  • The restored former Chesapeake & Ohio passenger depot in Canal Winchester, Ohio on July 22, 1997. Behind this depot remains a grain elevator (not pictured) that was once served by the railroad. Visit Dave Dupler's Railroad Photos of Southern Ohio page for a photo of this station in 1975. (A vintage photograph of this station is available here at the C&O Historical Society.)
  • The former Scioto Valley Traction Railroad depot in Canal Winchester on May 16, 2007. This structure is now part of a bank. (Thank you Ed Thomas for alerting me to this one.)
  • Three views (1 | 2 | 3) of the restored former Scioto Valley Traction Railroad depot in Canal Winchester on June 23, 2010.
  • The depot in Carey, Ohio, now a senior citizen center, on July 3, 1999. According to Mark J. Camp, this was the Big Four (CCC&StL) depot.
  • The Chesapeake & Ohio passenger depot from Carroll, Ohio, now located on the Fairfield County Fairgrounds in Lancaster, Ohio on July 23, 2000.
  • The interior of the Carroll depot and the curator in Union uniform banging out American Morse Code on the sounder on July 23, 2000.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former Toledo & Ohio Central depot in Chauncey on September 10, 2011.
  • The former B&O depot in Chillicothe, Ohio on May 2, 1997. This building now houses a furniture restoring business. John Thompson, Jr. has provided a scan of a vintage photo of this depot.
  • The Cincinnati Union Terminal in Cincinnati, Ohio in December, 1998. This splendid art-deco railroad terminal is now the Cincinnati Museum Center. It still serves as an Amtrak station for The Cardinal and Midwest Corridor. The former tower is open to the public and offers tremendous views (photo 1 and photo 2) of the NS yard and intermodal facility behind the terminal. For more information about the Cincinnati Union Terminal, visit the Cincinnati Museum Center web site. (A circa-1945 photograph of the C&O gate within this station is available here, and a circa-1945 photograph of C&O employees operating Interlocking Tower A is available here at the C&O Historical Society.)
  • A close-up view of the edifice of the terminal in December, 1998.
  • A view of the former PRR depot in Circleville, Ohio on March 26, 2000. This structure is now a self-storage facility.
  • A second view of the depot in Circleville on March 26, 2000.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the remains of the T&OC's Clemons Station near Alexandria on June 11, 2010. The remains of the Clemons Station are located on what's now the T.J. Evans Trail. From the historical marker:
  • This is the abandoned site of Clemons Station, a typical Ohio whistle-stop in the early 20th century. During its peak, nearly 15 trains a day rolled by with many stopping to take on fuel, water and passengers. An important feature of Clemons Station was its 24 hour telegraph office.

    For several years the station also doubled as a hotel and sleeping quarters for railroad workers and conductors

    The conversion of trains from steam power to diesel (beginning in the 1940's) made most fuel and water stops like Clemons Station obsolete, and the remains of a few building foundations are all that is left of this once bustling stop.

  • Three views (1 | 2 | 3) of the original Port Columbus Airport Terminal on November 15, 2009. This facility was in active use from 1929 until 1958. The text from the historial marker (below) implies that this structure served as a railroad station until 1930. From the historical marker:
  • The original Port Columbus Airport terminal was founded by the people of Columbus and was one of the first airport facilities in the United States. Dedicated on July 8, 1929, Port Columbus was the first transfter point in the westbound transcontinental passenger service, which was operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad, Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT), and the Sante Fe Railway. Its first passengers departed by rail from New York City on July 7, 1929, and boarded TAT Ford Tri-Motor aircraft at Port Columbus to fly to Waynoka, Oklahoma, the following day. They then traveled by rail to Clovis, New Mexico, and completed their journey with a TAT flight to Los Angeles. The scheduled 48-hour trip was celebrated in Columbus, marking the beginning milestone of national airport travel.

    With the nation sinking into the Great Depression, the national air travel venture at Port Columbus was not profitable enough. As a result, the scheduled train-plane operation was suspended and replaced with coast-to-coast air service in 1930. The arrival of mail service at the airport in 1930 helped, as did a huge contract with the Curtiss-Wright Corporation in 1940. Curtis-Wright leased 83 acres of airport property to produce 6000 planes, including the SB2C Helldiver and SO3C-1 Seagull aircraft. The federal government took over airport operations in 1941. In 1942 a Naval Air Facility was established adding several new buildings and lengthening runways. This building served as the passenger terminal until the present terminal opened on September 21, 1958.

  • The former Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad Station in Columbus, Ohio on November 29, 1996. Passengers boarded the trains from a second-floor platform. This photo was hand-held at a 1/4 second exposure; the white blur on the left is a passing vehicle. (A circa-1900 photograph of this station with the tracks at-grade can be found here at the C&O Historical Society.)
  • A view inside the T&OC depot on June 25, 1999. The following text came from a now-gone Volunteers of America web page describing the station:
  • The Toledo and Ohio Central Railway station at 379 West Broad Street in Columbus, Ohio, is the largest remaining 19th century railroad palace in central Ohio. Paul Randolph, former dean of the Yale University School of Architecture, was quoted in the Columbus Dispatch after a visit as saying, "It is one of the most fascinating things I've ever seen in my life!" Today it serves as local headquarters for Volunteers of America, a national organization with a variety of charitable and service programs.

    The "T&OC" station was built in 1895 and was designed by the architectural team of Yost and Packard who are responsible for the design of many other central Ohio landmarks. They include the former Ohio State University Armory, the Chittenden Hotel, and the still-standing Broad Street Methodist Church. The central tower at the front of the depot gives the building a pagoda look - an oriental aspect - but authorities credit the roots of the design to French and Swiss feudal architecture. Large clock faces on three sides of the tower during the first decade of its existence were a daily reference for Broad Street travelers. The clock faces and works have been removed. Railroad tracks originally were at ground level, but the Broad Street and railroad grades were separated in 1910 to allow for a smoother flow of burgeoning automobile traffic. The rails were raised and bridged over Broad Street which was lowered. Cars no longer needed to stop for passing trains. The tracks now are owned by Conrail, but the depot is owned the Volunteers of America.

    During construction of the elevated tracks, a devastating fire burned the roof off the depot on November 10, 1910, but within a few days the roof was replaced and the depot was open for business. When the rails were elevated, a ramp was built on the east side of the depot and curved up and around behind it to bring passengers and freight from Broad Street up to the newly raised track level.

    Disaster struck again on March 25, 1913 when a flood, which killed 732 people in southern Ohio and Indiana, wiped out rail and other transportation facilities. It brought the Scioto River up five feet into the T&OC Depot's "grand lobby" as the river and debris flowed west along Broad Street. Today, a small brass plaque on the side of the balcony staircase marks the high water mark.

    Over the years, the depot served as a major transportation terminal. Recruits boarded trains here with the onset of World War I, and veterans returned from war to victory parades. Similarly, Ohio State University football teams boarded trains here for their away games as the Buckeye Band (TBDBITL) played them aboard.

    By the late 1920's, the T&OC facilities had become part of the New York Central Railroad which moved its terminal operations to Union Station on North High Street where the Columbus Convention Center now stands.

    Just as the depot became surplus to the New York Central Railroad, the old Volunteers of America facilities on Front Street were taken by eminent domain by the State of Ohio to make room for new state office buildings. New York Central officials made the old station available to the VOA for a rent of $1 for the first year and then sold the station to the VOA the next year, in 1930. It is just four blocks from the old VOA facilities on Front Street. The station has served as the local Volunteers of America headquarters since.

    Disaster struck again in 1959 in the form of a flood and again on January 20, 1975 in the form of a two-alarm late-evening fire which burned the roof off the historic depot. The wood arches of the barrel-vaulted lobby ceiling survived the fire and were restored and new tin work was installed. The original skylight is now lit with florescent lights. The plaster "Cupid" arches on either end of the ceiling vaults were restored with new plaster casts made from molds taken after the fire from remnants of the original bas relief work. Several damaged marble wall panels had to be replaced as did lighting fixtures. New carvings replaced the damaged wood decorations on the bulletin boards, and a new grill had to be made for the ticket office window.

    The depot has been adapted to serve the modern needs of Volunteers of America while preserving much of the 100-year-old architecture. The U. S. Department of the Interior has placed the T&OC station on the National Register of Historic Places.

    The building is open to visitors from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday except on major holidays. The decorative "grand lobby" may be rented for parties, receptions, or meetings. Inquiries may be made by phoning (614) 224-8650.

  • The T&OC Station in the middle of a $2.4 million renovation on October 28, 2007. Note the new wing and porch roof.
  • The station in Delaware, Ohio, now a flower shop, on August 6, 1996. According to Mark J. Camp, this station once served the the CCC&StL, or Big Four; the HV and PRR had separate stations elsewhere in town. Photo taken 6 August, 1996.
  • The freight house in Delaware, Ohio before restoration and after restoration, now storage for the flower shop, on August 6, 1996 and July 17, 2004.
  • The depot in Dennison, Ohio on July 31, 2004. This building now houses the The Dennison Railroad Museum.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former B&O depot in Deshler on September 13, 2009.
  • The station in Dover, Ohio on September 30, 2000. This formerly B&O station now belongs to the R.J. Corman Company.
  • The Telegraph Office in Dover, Ohio on September 30, 2000. This building used to be next to the depot but has been moved to the Warther Museum.
  • The depot in Dresden, Ohio, now owned and maintained by the Longaberger Basket Company, on October 4, 1998.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of what appears to be a depot near Enon on May 17, 2012.
  • The former NKP freight house in Findlay on September 9, 2007.
  • The B&O depot in Fostoria Ohio, now an Amtrak station, on July 3, 1999.
  • A wooden depot in Fostoria, Ohio on July 3, 1999; According to Dan West and Mark J. Camp, this depot was used by the T&OC.
  • The C&O freight house in Fostoria, Ohio on July 3, 1999.
  • The former N&W freight house in Fremont on September 9, 2007.
  • The passenger depot in Fremont on September 9, 2007.
  • A decayed wooden depot in Fulton on February 10, 2008. This structure was moved from its original location in Fulton.
  • The Big Four depot (street-side view | trackside view) in Galion, Ohio on November 7, 2004. From the historical marker:

    This Depot, dedicated on December 27, 1900, served as division headquarters for the Cleveland, Chicago, Cincinnati, and St.Louis railroad, commonly called the Big Four. Peak passenger usage occurred during and after World War I when 32 trains stopped here daily. Railway Express serviced as many as 20 trains a day into the 1950s, and Galion became a "whistle stop" for presidential campaigns with speeches from the train platform from such candidates as Al Smith in 1928, Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, and Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon in 1952. In 1929 the New York Central acquired the Big Four, which moved the division headquarters west to Bellefontaine in Logan County. The ticket office remained opened until 1964, but all railroad offices closed in 1969. The Depot was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

  • The former Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton depot in Glendale, Ohio on May 3, 1997. This depot was opened after restoration the day I photographed it, and is now the site of a railroad museum. Unfortunately, the museum had closed for the day before I arrived.
  • The historical marker of the C, H, and D Railroad depot in Glendale, Ohio showing a construction date of 1880, on May 3, 1997.
  • The former Toledo & Ohio Central Depot in Granville, Ohio, now a real estate office, on August 11, 1996. The former right-of-way has been turned into a bicycle path extending from Newark to Johnstown.
  • The Historical Register marker, showing a construction date of 1880, on August 11, 1996.
  • A very sad sight: The former Hocking Valley & Toledo depot in Haydenville, Ohio on July 25, 1996, after years of neglect, weather, and vandalism have taken their toll.
  • Another view of the former Hocking Valley & Toledo depot in Haydenville, Ohio on July 25, 1996.
  • And another view of the former Hocking Valley & Toledo depot in Haydenville, Ohio on July 25, 1996.
  • The 1872 depot near Hebron in August, 1998. This now serves as the depot for the Buckeye Central Railroad tourist shortline railroad.
  • The 1899 depot in Hilliard on May 24, 2003. This depot was originally on Main and Center Streets, was closed in 1962, and moved to the Franklin County Fairgrounds in 1969. Mark J. Camp reports that this was the PRR depot.
  • A depot-like structure in Hillsboro, Ohio, on October 20, 2003. Is this a depot that was moved from another location?
  • The former Norfolk & Western passenger depot in Ironton, Ohio on August 19, 1997. It is now an Italian restaurant.
  • A view of the former Chesapeake & Ohio freight depot in Jackson, Ohio on March 29, 1998.
  • A second view of the former C&O freight depot in Jackson, Ohio on March 29, 1998.
  • The rusting sign at the former C&O freight depot in Jackson, Ohio on March 29, 1998.
  • Streetside & trackside views of the now-restored depot in Jackson, on June 26, 2005.
  • The former Detroit, Toledo, & Ironton (DT&I) depot in Jackson, Ohio on March 29, 1998.
  • The depot in Johnstown, Ohio, now a printing company, on July 2, 1999. According to Mark J. Camp, this depot was used by the T&OC.
  • The 1882 former NYC depot in Kenton on September 7, 2008.
  • The Chesapeake & Ohio freight house in Lancaster, Ohio on July 27, 1996. This is now the location of the Lancaster FOP. (A 1980 photograph of this station is available here at the C&O Historical Society.)
  • Four views (1 | 2 | 3 | 4) of the former C&O freight station in Lancaster on April 22, 2010.
  • The former-PRR station in Lebanon on May 3, 1997. This station is now used by the Turtle Creek Valley Railway, a tourist shortline.
  • The Indiana & Ohio depot in Leesburg, Ohio on May 2, 1997. According to Mark J. Camp, this once served the B&O.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the depot in Lexington on February 10, 2008. This structure is now a seniors' center.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former DT&I depot in Lima on September 7, 2008. This structure is now a bar. A stone in the foundation indicates the depot was built in 1923.
  • Two trackside views (1 | 2 and a streetside view of the former PRR depot in Lima on September 7, 2008. This depot is on what used to be the PRR New York-to-Chicago mainline.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former Hocking Valley depot in Logan on September, 2011.
  • The Marietta and Cincinnati Depot in Madeira, Ohio, on October 18, 2003. According to the plaque on the site, the original depot was built in 1872. The current structure is either an enlargement or reconstruction of the original building. The depot ceased operation in 1971. The building now serves as a restaurant.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the decaying depot in Mansfield on February 10, 2008.
  • A building that may have been a freight depot in Mansfield on February 10, 2008.
  • The under-restoration Marion Union Station in Marion, Ohio on August 8, 1996. This station is being restored by the Marion Union Station Association. It once served the Erie; the Hocking Valley, Columbus, & Toledo; and the "Big Four".
  • Another view of the Marion Union Station on August 8, 1996. The hexagonal room to the left was the telegrapher's office and has a lovely view of what is now the CSXT and Conrail lines. The following text comes from the North American Railroad Terminal Index Page:
  • The Marion Union Station was built through the urging of Warren G. Harding who later became the President of the United Sates. At the time he was publisher of the newspaper in Marion. Prior to the building of Marion Union Station, Marion had a dilapidated passenger coach serving as a ticket station. Marion Union Station figured prominently during World War Two. Troops stopped here for canteen service. In 1923, the body of President Warren G. Harding was brought through the station to be taken to his father's home for the funeral. Movie stars including Al Jolson came through the station during Harding's famous "Front Porch" campaign for the Presidency. A non-profit group purchased the station just before the wrecking ball would have torn it down. Restoration is about complete and the station serves as a railfan site for filming trains. It is said to be one of the hot spots in the nation for photography.

  • Streetside and trackside views of the depot in Middletown on August 4, 2006.
  • A view of what may have been a freight depot near Middletown on August 4, 2006.
  • The former Millersport T&OC depot, now in Carroll, Ohio, and owned by Brian Maiher, on September 20, 2002. Mr. Maiher reports that he will soon be painting the depot.
  • Two views (1 | 2 of the former Mt. Gilead Shortline depot in Mt. Gilead on September 5, 2011. This building is now the Mt. Gilead Municipal Building.
  • A depot in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, on February 14, 1999. According to Eric Porch, this is a former CA&C (PRR) depot.
  • A second view of the depot in Mt. Vernon on February 14, 1999.
  • Two views of the former C&O depot in Murray City (1 | 2), before restoration, on February 14, 1999.
  • Three views of the former C&O depot in Murray City (1 | 2 | 3), after restoration, on July 11, 2004.
  • Learn more about the Murray City depot by visiting the Murray City Train Depot Restoration Project website.
  • Two views 1 | 2 of the Hocking Valley Scenic Railway in Nelsonville in 1996. This depot was built by the HVSR to serve the tourist shortline.
  • The former Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Newark on November 29, 1996. Passengers exited the depot in back, walked beneath the tracks and up stairs to the boarding platform at track level. Visit Dave Dupler's Northern Ohio Railroad Photos page for photo of this station in 1975.
  • The "PRR" logo above the door of the Newark Pennsy station on November 29, 1996.
  • The freight depot in New Lexington
  • The former B&O depot in Outville in June 2000.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former B&O depot in Outville and the historical marker on September 5, 2013.
  • The T&OC depot in Pickerington, now the office of a State Farm Insurance agent, on June 25, 1999.
  • Telegraph equipment in the Pickerington T&OC depot on June 25, 1999.
  • Train order hoops in the Pickerington T&OC depot on June 25, 1999.
  • A 1906 "Excursion" schedule displayed in the Pickerington T&OC depot on June 25, 1999.
  • A section house from the T&OC on June 25, 1999. This structure was originally near Pickerington but is now located next to the depot and houses a photography shop.
  • Four views (1 | 2 | 3 | 4) of the Sandusky Amtrak station on February 7, 2012. This station serves Amtrak's "The Lake Shore Limited" line.
  • A depot in Sharonville, Ohio on August 3, 2001. Mark J. Camp reports that this is a modern replica of a station.
  • The Cincinnati, Lebanon, and Northern Railroad Depot in Silverton, Ohio, on October 20, 2003. This depot was built in the early 1880s and is now a community museum.
  • A structure in Sunbury, Ohio that might have been a freight house on July 2, 1999. Mark J. Camp confirms that this was a PRR station.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of Desmond Depot in Urbana on April, 16, 2010.
  • Three views (1 | 2 | 3) of the former Mad River & Lake Erie depot in Urbana on April 16, 2010.
  • A building that might have been a depot in Urbana on April 14, 2012.
  • A building that might have been a freight depot in Urbana on April 14, 2012.
  • The recently-restored passenger depot in Wellston on August 19, 1997.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the passenger depot in Wellston on May 5, 2013.
  • The Ohio Railway Museum depot in Worthington, Ohio, on June 25, 1999. According to Mark J. Camp, this depot is a modern replica of a depot.
  • The former NYC station in Zaneville on April 22, 2010.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former B&O freight station in Zaneville on April 22, 2010.
  • Two views (1 | 2) of the former PRR station in Zaneville on April 22, 2010.

Pennsylvania

Tennessee

Virginia

  • A depot in Duffield on August 27, 2004. This depot was built for the movie Coal Miner's Daughter and was purchased afterwards by a gentleman named Fannon and moved to its current location in 8' wide pieces. It is choc-a-bloc with railroadiana, a veritable museum.

West Virginia

Ontario, Canada

Turkey

  • Two views (1 | 2) of the Incirlik, Turkey railroad station in March 2, 2007.

Coaling Bunkers by State (return to top)
Quick Jump: Ohio | West Virginia

Ohio

  • Three views (1 | 2 | 3) of the former Hocking Valley & Toledo concrete coaling bunkers on what is now the CSX near Carey on September 13, 2009.
  • The ex-PRR coaling depot north of Marion, Ohio, with a drag of empty NS hoppers passing beneath on August 8, 1996. This line was the former PRR Sandusky Branch which was sold to N&W in the 1960s. (Thanks to Matthew Link for the information.)
  • The Hocking Valley and Columbus Railway Coaling Bunker in Nelsonville, Ohio, now owned by the Hocking Valley Scenic Railroad, on July 11, 1996.
West Virginia

Bridges, Overpasses, and Viaducts by State (return to top)

Quick Jump: Indiana | Maryland DC | North Carolina | Ohio | West Virginia

Indiana

Maryland and the District of Columbia

North Carolina

Ohio

West Virginia

Other Structures by State (return to top)
Quick Jump: Indiana | Kentucky | Maryland | Michigan | North Carolina | Ohio | Pennsylvania | Virginia | West Virginia

Indiana

Kentucky

  • The tunnel in Frankfort on July 12, 2011. This tunnel was hand-bored in 1849 by the Lexington & Frankfort Railroad. This tunnel now serves CSX.
  • Street-side and track-side views of what appears to be the headquarters of TTI Railroad ("The Rail to River Route") in Paris on June 30, 2009. This building is across the tracks from the old passenger station.
  • CSX's RU Tower in Russell, still active on August 19, 1997. It is now retired but has been saved from the wrecking ball by a local group; it is undergoing restoration to be a museum.
Maryland and the District of Columbia

  • The beautifully restored Baltimore and Ohio roundhouse in Baltimore on August 27, 1995. The Glassy-Eyed Railfan is standing next to C&O 1604 Allegheny. From Wes Barris' B&O Railroad Museum page:
  • This is one of only two remaining Alleghenys (2-6-6-6). The Alleghenys have the distinction of being the heaviest steam locomotives ever built in the Unites States (778,000lbs). They also have the highest horsepower rating (7,500 @40MPH) of any steam locomotive (even higher than that of the Big Boys)

    UPDATE! On February 17, 2002 the two-thirds of the roof of the roundhouse collapsed after a snow and ice storm. Watch the B&O Railroad Museum website for news on the restoration.

  • Another view of the B&O roundhouse on August 27, 1995. This is a completely enclosed roundhouse.
  • A third view of the Baltimore & Ohio's Mt. Clare Roundhose in Baltimore, now the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum, on August 19, 1999.
  • A view of Baltimore & Ohio's Mt. Clare Roundhouse and Station in Baltimore on August 16, 1999.
  • The Baltimore & Ohio's Mt. Clare Passenger Car Shops in Baltimore on August 19, 1999. This large L-shaped building, built in 1870 with tall Palladian windows, decorative cornice, massive doors, and track leads served the B&O as their passenger car rehabilitation facilities. Today the building is used for the maintenance and restoration of the museum's collection of rolling stock and railroad artifacts.
  • Brush Tunnel on the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad on August 19, 1999.
  • The turntable in Frostburg on the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad on August 19, 1999.
Michigan

North Carolina

Ohio

Pennsylvania

  • Former PRR engine shops building in Altoona on November 6, 2004; this building now is the site of Railroaders Memorial Museum.
  • Former PRR engine shops building in Altoona on November 6, 2004; this building now is part of Altoona Pipe and Steel.
  • Former PRR engine shops building in Altoona on November 6, 2004; this building now is part of Altoona Pipe and Steel. From the historic marker:
  • "The PRR built its first repair facilities here in 1850 and opened its first track to Altoona during the same year. By 1925 Altoona was home to the nation's largest concentration of railroad shops, with 16,500 people employed in several locations.

  • Two aerial views of the Horseshoe Curve at Altoona (Kitanning Point): in the late morning & in the late evening of November 6, 2004. The Horseshoe Curve opened on February 15, 1854. Fifty to seventy trains pass over the Curve daily.
  • A track-side shanty at Altoona (Kitanning Point/Horseshoe Curve) on November 6, 2004.
  • Alto Tower: trackside view in Altoona on November 6, 2004 & street-side view on May 22, 2005
  • The pair of tunnels in Gallitzin on November 6, 2004. These tunnels pass under the town of Gallitzin.

Virginia

West Virginia